The Series

In the LITERARY ARCHITECTURE SERIES, Matteo Pericoli shares some of his designs and what they reveal about the stories they are modeled on. The series has been featured in The Paris Review Daily since May 2016 and, until December 2016, also in the Italian national newspaper La Stampa. As of February 2017, the Italian series has been featured in the Italian weekly Pagina99.

    • WILLIAM FAULKNER, AS I LAY DYING
    • The actual protagonist of [the] novel … is the reader.
    • Continue reading at:
    • pagina99
    • FYODOR DOSTOYEVSKY, WHITE NIGHTS
    • We are used to seeing skyscrapers soaring on a city…
    • Continue reading at:
    • The Paris Review | pagina99
    • JUN’ICHIRŌ TANIZAKI, THE KEY
    • The two spouses’ souls … never meet nor try to know each other. They intersect without ever touching.
    • Continue reading at:
    • The Paris Review | pagina99
    • ELENA FERRANTE, MY BRILLIANT FRIEND
    • We, too, are … suspended between tension and compression
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    • The Paris Review | pagina99
    • JUAN JOSÈ SAER, THE WITNESS
    • The architectural space is … perfect, pure. It’s not constructed space, but obtained instead by removing material from a mountain.
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    • The Paris Review | pagina99
    • EMMANUEL CARRÈRE, THE ADVERSARY
    • “I thought I could … remain objective. But objectivity, in such an undertaking, is a delusion.” …
    • Continue reading at:
    • The Paris Review | La Stampa

     

    • JOSEPH CONRAD, HEART OF DARKNESS
    • The skyscraper looming above us is composed of a clean, well-defined volume …
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    • The Paris Review | La Stampa

     

    • FRIEDRICH DÜRRENMATT, THE JUDGE AND HIS HANGMAN
    • The building is clean and compact. We see its solids and voids: elements of a structure that, at first glance, is whole and homogeneous.
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    • The Paris Review | La Stampa
    • KURT VONNEGUT, SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE
    • How can a horrific event, so monstrous that it seems incomprehensible, be told? How does one even find the words to write about it?
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    • The Paris Review | La Stampa
    • ANNIE ERNAUX, LES ANNÉES
    • … the author writes that she “would like to unify the multiplicity of images of herself – separate, disjoined – through the thread of a story: that of her existence …”
    • Continue reading at:
    • The Paris Review | La Stampa
    • ITALO CALVINO, THE BARON IN THE TREES
    • “Rebellion cannot be measured by yards … Even when a journey seems no distance at all, it can have no return.”
    • Continue reading at:
    • The Paris Review | La Stampa